N.E.A‚Äč.L's DAYCARE

"Where Learning Is Fundamental!"


Blog

Tips on Preparing Your Child for Back to School...

Posted on July 29, 2013 at 3:32 PM Comments comments ()
When summer winds down, it’s time to get ready for a new school year. Buying notebooks and scoping out sales is the easy part. There are less tangible things you can do as well.

Here are 9 ways you can help your child -- and yourself -- get ready to go back to school.

1. Re-Establish School Routines
Use the last few weeks of summer to get into a school-day rhythm. "Have your child practice getting up and getting dressed at the same time every morning," suggests school psychologist Kelly Vaillancourt, MA, CAS. Start eating breakfast, lunch, and snacks around the times your child will eat when school is in session.

It’s also important to get your child used to leaving the house in the morning, so plan morning activities outside the house in the week or two before school. That can be a challenge for working parents, says Vaillancourt, who is the director of government relations for the National Association of School Psychologists. But when the school rush comes, hustling your child out the door will be less painful if she has broken summer habits like relaxing in her PJs after breakfast.

2. Nurture Independence
Once the classroom door shuts, your child will need to manage a lot of things on his own. Get him ready for independence by talking ahead of time about responsibilities he's old enough to shoulder. This might include organizing his school materials, writing down assignments, and bringing home homework, says Nicole Pfleger, school counselor at Nickajack Elementary School in Smyrna, GA.

Even if your child is young, you can instill skills that will build confidence and independence at school. Have your young child practice writing her name and tying her own shoes. "The transition to school will be easier for everyone if your child can manage basic needs without relying on an adult," Pfleger says.

3. Create a Launch Pad
"Parents and teachers should do whatever they can to facilitate a child being responsible," says Pfleger, who was named School Counselor of the Year by the American School Counselor Association in 2012. At home, you can designate a spot where school things like backpacks and lunch boxes always go to avoid last-minute scrambles in the morning. You might also have your child make a list of things to bring to school and post it by the front door.

4. Set Up a Time and Place for Homework
Head off daily battles by making homework part of your child’s everyday routine. Establish a time and a place for studying at home. "Even if it’s the kitchen table, it really helps if kids know that’s where they sit down and do homework, and that it happens at the same time every day," says Pfleger. As much as possible, plan to make yourself available during homework time, especially with younger kids. You might be reading the paper or cooking dinner, but be around to check in on your child’s progress.

5. After-School Plans
School gets out before most working parents get home, so it's important to figure out where your children will go, or who will be at home, in the afternoons. You might find an after-school program through the school itself, a local YMCA, or a Boys and Girls Club. If possible, try to arrange your schedule so you can be there when your child gets home during those first few days of school. It may help your child adjust to the new schedule and teachers.

6. Make a Sick-Day Game Plan
Working parents also know the trials and tribulations of getting a call from the school nurse when they can’t get away from the office. "Most of our parents, because of the economy, are working," says Pfleger. Before school begins, line up a trusted babysitter or group of parents that can pinch hit for each other when children get sick. And make sure you know the school’s policy. You may have to sign forms ahead of time listing people who have your permission to pick up your child.

7. Attend Orientations to Meet and Greet
Schools typically hold orientation and information sessions before the start of each academic year. These are good opportunities for you to meet the key players: your child’s teachers, school counselors, the principle, and most importantly, front desk staff. "The secretaries know everything and are the first people children see when they arrive at school every day," says Vaillancourt.

8. Talk to the Teachers
Of course, teachers are the reason your child is there. When you talk to your child’s teachers, ask about their approach to homework. Some teachers assign homework so kids can practice new skills while others focus on the accuracy of the assignments they turn in. Ask for the dates of tests and large assignments so you can help your child plan accordingly. For instance, if you know a big test is coming up on Friday morning, you will know to keep things simple on Thursday evening.

9. Make it a Family Affair
Together, you and your child can plan for success in school. For instance, sit down with your child to create a routine chart. Ask your child what she wants to do first when she first gets home from school: play outside or do homework? Her answers go on the chart. "The more kids have ownership in creating a routine for themselves and setting expectations, the more likely they are to follow it," says Vaillancourt.

SOURCE: By Joanne Barker
                http://www.webmd.com

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS...

Posted on August 1, 2012 at 11:01 PM Comments comments ()
If You Have Any Ideas or Suggestions That You Would Like To Share About Getting Prepared For Back To School, Please Feel Free To Comment.

How To Keep Your Children Interested In Reading For The Summer?

Posted on May 18, 2012 at 4:22 PM Comments comments ()
Has parents we are our children's first and most important teachers, and our role as their teachers is to motivate our children to read during the summer months. There are many strategies that we might employ as parents to encourage summertime reading:
 
Combine activities with books, in which you and your children could read a book about going to the park, attending a baseball game, or swimming at the pool before going to those places. This would provide your children with the opportunity to have an open discussion and share their thoughts about these activities and others.
 
Visit the local library is another great way to encourage your children to read during the summertime. They have a wide selection of books to borrow, as well as many libraries have fun, child-friendly summer reading programs.
 
Leading by example is just picking up a morning newspaper, reading a magazine while at the doctors office , or just relaxing with one of your favorite books. This helps our children understand that literature can be a fun and important part of their summer days just by seeing us as adults reading often.
 
Have plenty of reading material around that includes newspapers, magazines, and informational material on hand that might spark the interest of our young readers.
 
Read aloud with your children by having enthusiastic read-alouds, no matter what their age, and improvise different voices or wear silly clothes to make the story more interesting.
 
Pleas share your thoughts and ideas on how we could keep our children interested in reading over the summer.
 
A List of Children Preferred Books to Read:
 
Books for Ages 3 and under
BUT NOT THE HIPPOPOTAMUS
By Sandra Boynton
ONE DUCK STUCK
By Phyllis Root; Illustrated by Jane Chapman
FREIGHT TRAIN
By Donald Crews
OWL BABIES
By Martin Waddell
BROWN BEAR, BROWN, BEAR, WHAT DO YOU SEE?
By Bill Martin Jr.
BLUEBERRIES FOR SAL
By Robert McCloskey
HERE A CHICK, THERE A CHICK
By Bruce McMillan
 
Books for Ages 4 to 8
FOR LAUGHING OUT LOUD: POEMS TO TICKLE YOUR FUNNYBONE
Selected by Jack Prelutsky; Illustrated by Marjorie Priceman
KITE FLYING
By Grace Lin
DEAR ZOO
By Rod Campbell
MORE SPAGHETTI, I SAY!
By Rita Golden Gelman; Illustrated by Mort Gerberg
HOOPS WITH SWOOPES
By Susan Kuklin with Sheryl Swoopes
THE MUNSCHWORKS GRAND TREASURY: STORIES
By Robert Munsch
THE VERY KIND RICH LADY AND HER ONE HUNDRED DOGS
By Chinlun Lee
MICE AND BEANS
By Pan Munoz; Illustrated by Joe Cepeda
THE RELATIVES CAME
By Cynthia Rylant; Illustrated by Stephen Gammell
SILLY SALLY
By Audrey Wood
McBROOM TELLS A LIE
By Sid Fleischman
ELVIS THE TURNIP ... AND ME (THE ZACK FILES)
By Dan Greenburg
DANITRA BROWN LEAVES TOWN
By Nikki Grimes; Illustrated by Floyd Cooper
WE THE KIDS: THE PREAMBLE TO THE CONSTITUTION
By David Catrow
ARE YOU MY MOTHER?
By Philip D. Eastman
 
Books for Ages 9 to 12
MR. POPPER'S PENGUINS
By Richard and Florence Atwater; Illustrations by Robert Lawson
ELLA ENCHANTED
By Gail Carson Levine
STUART LITTLE
By E.B. White; Illustrated by Garth Williams
A LONG WAY FROM CHICAGO
By Richard Peck
THE BFG
By Roald Dahl
SUMMER READING IS KILLING ME! (THE TIME WARP TRIO)
By Jon Scieszka; Illustrations By Lane Smith
THE GREAT BRAIN
By John D. Fitzgerald; Illustrated By Mercer Mayer